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Chinese police open fire on Tibetan protestors in Loshu PDF Print E-mail
On 12 August 2014, Tibetans took to the streets in Loshu town, eastern Tibet to protest against the arbitrary arrest of a village leader. Chinese police violently suppressed the demonstration using live ammunition and tear gas. At least ten Tibetans were seriously injured and many, possibly hundreds, have been detained. The Chinese authorities are denying medical treatment to those injured. Six Tibetans have since died, four succumbing to their injuries and two committing suicide.

Loshu (Chinese: Luoxo) is located in Sershul (Ch: Shiqu) county, Kardze (Ch: Ganzi) prefecture, Kham (now incorporated in China's Sichuan province). Some reports also refer to Derge, which is a traditional Tibetan area now part of Sershul county.


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Latest updates
4 Sept: Policeman dies; second suicide; severe beating & two more detained
20 Aug:
Three more Tibetans die from injuries
18 Aug: Two deaths in detention; injured denied treatment
15 Aug: Ten seriously injured as Chinese police open fire on protestors


Two deaths, detainee severely beaten and two further detentions
Sershul protest[4 September 2014] Further details have emerged from the Loshu shooting on 12 August (pictured right) and the subsequent crackdown. A Chinese policeman died from 'friendly fire' in the incident, the wife of one the detainees has committed suicide, an elderly Tibetan woman has been severely beaten whilst in detention and two Tibetans have been arrested for taking photos of the protest.

Though the Chinese authorities continue to block communication lines with the region, further information about the shooting in Loshu on 12 August and the aftermath continues to slowly leak out.

According to a source quoted by Radio Free Asia, a Chinese policeman died following the 12 August incident. He was apparently shot accidently in the neck by a fellow police officer. However, the source said, "The local government is tight-lipped about the incident.

The same source also said the aunt of Wangdak, the detained village chief, has been severely beaten whilst in detention and is now "immobile and unable to speak". Dawa Lhamo, 64, has been taken to hospital but family members have been prevented from visiting her.

On 18 August, Jinpa Tharchin's pregnant wife hanged herself after learning her husband had died in detention after the Chinese authorities refused treatment for his wounds obtained during the protest crackdown. Her name is not yet known. Her death is the second suicide related to the shooting. Lo Palsang killed himself whilst in detention in protest against the ill-treatment by the Chinese authorities.

Two Tibetan men, Tsekhok and Pagya (or Pelgyal), are reported to have been detained by the Chinese authorities for taking photos of the protest 12 August. Both men are from Yundok village in Sershul county. The date of their detention, their current whereabouts and condition are not known.

According to Voice of America, some of the Tibetans initially detained during and after the 12 August incident have since been released; however, the numbers of those detained and those released remains unclear. Some reports indicate up to 200 Tibetans were detained.

Further reading:
RFA (3 Sept) I VOA I ICT I RFA (26 Aug)


Three more Tibetans die from injuries after Loshu shooting
Sershul protest[20 August 2014] UPDATE: The death toll from the Loshu incident on 12 August has reached five, as three more Tibetans have succumbed to their injuries. One of the dead is the uncle of Wangdak, the village chief whose initial arrest prompted the protest in Loshu (pictured right).

On 18 August, the bodies of three Tibetans detained following the Loshu protest were returned to their families. It is understood they died from untreated wounds. All three were related and have been identified as Tsewang Gonpo (60), Yeshe (42) and Jinpa Tharchin (18). Tsewang Gonpo is the uncle of Dema Wangdak, the village chief who was arbitrarily arrested by Chinese police and whose release protestors were demanding.

According to a source quoted by Radio Free Asia, the three Tibetans "were refused medical care and had been tortured by the Chinese authorities... [and] succumbed to their injuries in custody."

Despite China's restriction on the flow of information from Tibet, a few further details have emerged from Loshu and the region.

Following the 12 August protest, Chinese security forces arrived in Shugba village, the home of the detained chief Dema Wangdak, and detained Tibetan males above the age of 12 or 13. According to a source quoted by International Campaign for Tibet, "only children, women and elderly people remain in the village".

WangchenThe Chinese authorities are denying treatment of those injured in the protest. According to a source quoted by International Campaign for Tibet, Doctors in the hospital are not removing the bullets from the wounds of the injured even though some people are critically ill.

Among the injured is Kunga Sherab, son of Wangdak. Amongst the detained is Wangchen (pictured right), the vice-chief of Shugba village and Karma Rinchen, the chanting master from Miru monastery.

Further reading:
ICT I RFA I Phayul


Two Tibetans die in detention; injured denied treatment
[18 August 2014] UPDATE: Two Tibetans involved in the Loshu protest on 12 August have died, one from untreated wounds, the other committed suicide whilst in detention. There are accusations the Chinese authorities are denying medical treatment to those injured during the protest.

According to sources quoted by Radio Free Asia, a 22-year old Tibetan male, as yet unidentified, died on 17 August from injuries received during the protest which were not subsequently treated. The sources also said another Tibetan, Lo Palsang, committed suicide whilst in detention "in protest against torture by the Chinese authorities".

There are serious concerns over the condition of the remaining Tibetans injured during the protest. Initially they were taken to hospital but are now reported to have been transferred to the Loshu detention centre and denied further medical treatment. Several of the wounded are still believed to have bullets in their bodies.

The exact number of Tibetans injured and detained following the Loshu protest is still not known.

Further reading:
Radio Free Asia


Ten seriously injured as Chinese police open fire on protestors
[15 August 2014] At least ten Tibetans were seriously injured when Chinese police fired into a crowd of protestors in Sichuan province on 12 August. The protestors were calling for the release of a village leader detained the day before. Many Tibetans are reported to have been detained and beaten, others have gone into hiding and security has been tightened in the region.

Dema WangdakThe protest, involving hundreds of Tibetans, took place in Loshu township, Sershul (Chinese: Shiqu) county, Kardze (Ch: Ganzi) prefecture, Kham (now incorporated in China's Sichuan province). The protestors were calling for the release of Dema Wangdak (pictured right), a village leader who had been arrested the day before.

Chinese police violently suppressed the protest, using live ammunition and tear gas to disperse the crowd, as well as beating protestors. At least ten Tibetans were reported to be seriously injured with gunshot wounds (pictured below right). The wounded were taken to a hospital in Jyekundo (Ch: Yushu). The exact number of wounded, their identities and condition are not known.

Gunshot woundAfter the crowd was dispersed, security was stepped up in the region and communication lines cut. Many Tibetans are reported to have been detained, though the exact number is unknown. Others are said to have gone to the nearby hills to hide. According to Radio Free Asia, many of those that remained "have been interrogated and tortured by the Chinese security forces".

Dema Wangdak
, 45, was taken from his home in Shugba village (or Denma Shugpa) at midnight on 11 August and arrested by Chinese police.

Local sources say Wangdak's arrest resulted from an earlier altercation with Chinese officials. Wangdak, who has a reputation for standing up for the oppressed and vulnerable in his community, is said to have complained to the Chinese authorities over the harassment of Tibetan women by senior Chinese officials at a cultural event. The authorities responded by accusing Wangdak of holding an illegal prayer ceremony at a local horse festival.

The current condition of Dema Wangdak is not known and it is not clear if any charges have been made. Wangdak's son and brother are amongst those shot and injured during the protest.

Further reading:
BBC I Reuters I RFA I TCHRD I ICT

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